In the late 1800’s, JR Booth constructed a railway to move lumber from central Ontario to shipping yards on Georgian Bay. This railway was also the shortest link to connect together western Canada to eastern Canada.  Today, the Rose Point Trail is a 6km portion of the greater Park-to-Park Trail located James Bay Junction Road South through to Rose Point Road.

Hike, bike, horseback ride,  cross-country ski, or snowshoe on this 6km trail and discover the nature and history surrounding it. During the snow-free months, listen for a variety of bird species and amphibians that can be heard calling from the forest and wetland habitats along the trail.  On a warm sunny day, keep your eyes out for turtles basking in any of the wetlands along the trail.

This trail is also available to all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) and snowmobiles with proper permits.

Learn about a couple of species at risk in this area.

Information

Best Seasons to Visit

Spring

Summer

Fall

Winter

Things to Do Here

ATV

Cross Country Ski

Fat Bike

Hike

Horseback Ride

Mountain Bike

Snowmobile

Snowshoe

Trail Run

Getting Here

Local Resources

Explore this amazing place with help from local resources:

Seguin Township

Explore the natural beauty that surrounds the region. With a taste of adventure, or just the need for a relaxing jaunt, our community hosts hundreds of kilometers of local trails for the intermediate user to the go-getter.

Gallery

Species at Risk in the Spotlight

Olive-sided Flycatcher

Listen for the loud and distinct “quick, three beers” song of the olive-sided flycatcher as you walk the Rose Point Trail. This medium-sized song bird is typically found perched at the tops of trees and makes quick short flights to catch insects and then return to its perch.

Report your sightings of this threatened critter.

Learn More 
Red-shouldered Hawk

Look deep into a deciduous forest for this large hawk.  Just like it’s name, the Red-shouldered Hawk is best ID’ed by their reddish shoulders, and barred wings and tail. This hawk is a good news story! Improved forest management practices have assisted in stabilizing their population decline, leading them to be down-listed from Threatened to Special Concern.

Report your sightings of this threatened critter.

Learn More