With over 7000 hectares of scenic natural and wilderness landscape, Point Grondine Park is an Amazing Place. Hike through old growth pine forests and enjoy incredible views of the river, Wemtagoosh Falls, interior lakes and the nearby Killarney mountain range. Paddle a canoe or sea kayak the traditional routes of the Anishnaabek people.

Point Grondine Park, owned and operated by Wikwemkoong Unceded Territory First Nation, offers 22 backcountry campsites and over 20 kilometers of hiking trails. During the summer, learn about medicinal plants or traditional Anishnaabek songs with knowledgeable local guides.

The park is accessible through mandatory park permits and can be purchased online at www.grondinepark.com or by calling 1-705-859-3477.

Learn about a couple of species at risk in this area.

Information

Best Seasons to Visit

Spring

Summer

Fall

Things to Do Here

Canoe

Hike

Kayak

Trail Run

Getting Here

Local Resources

Explore this amazing place with help from local resources:

Point Grondine Park

First Nation owned and operated recreational park, Point Grondine has over 18,000 acres of scenic natural wilderness landscape, old growth pine forest, stunning river vistas and six interior lakes to explore.

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Species at Risk in the Spotlight

Canada Warbler

This brightly-colored warbler, the Canada warbler, is sometimes called the necklaced warbler because of the band of black streaks across the male’s breast.  They are found in cool, damp, mixed deciduous-coniferous forests with well-developed shrub layers. They are short-term visitors to Canada each year—typically staying 3 months before migrating back to South America.

Report your sightings of this threatened critter.

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Common Snapping Turtle

Ontario’s largest turtle, the common snapping turtle is at risk mainly due to road mortality. Roadless areas, like the French River delta, are an important refuge for this long-lived species. And don’t worry about swimming with snapping turtles—they are shy and will generally swim away to escape danger.

Report your sightings of this threatened critter.

Learn More